JASC logo JASC 2018

Executive Committee

From its origin, JASC has been organized by university students who are interested in global and bilateral issues facing the U.S. and Japan. This tradition of student leadership has endured more than 80 years and is maintained through Executive Committees.

Each year, JASC's Executive Committee is comprised of eight students representing the U.S. and eight students representing Japan. Elected by fellow delegates, Committee members work jointly across the Pacific to create and implement the next JASC.

Throughout the year, members of the American Executive Committee are supported by International Student Conferences in Washington, D.C. Similarly, members of the Japanese Executive Committee are supported by International Education Center in Tokyo.

70th JASC American Executive Committee


Emlyn Lee-Schalow

Chair
Rutgers University


Jacques Chaumont

Williams College


Carolyn Hoover

Duke University


Kitanna Hiromasa

Washington and Lee University


Ethan Mattos

Vice Chair
Hobart and William Smith Colleges


Nicole McNevin

Wheaton College


Emika Otsuka

Carleton College


Christina Zhou

University of California, Los Angeles

Introductions

Emlyn Lee-Schalow
Email:jasc70.eleeschalow@gmail.com
Hi everyone! My name is Emlyn Mio Lee-Schalow and I will be serving as the American Executive Committee Chair for the 2018, 70th Japan-America Student Conference (JASC). I am currently a Junior at Rutgers University, the State University of New Jersey, majoring in Marketing and minoring in French. Singing has always been a passion of mine, so in college I am part of a co-ed acappella called the Orphan Sporks. Last summer we reached an incredible milestone as a group, by successfully recording a CD, which will be one of my most memorable and proud accomplishments of my college career. Outside of school I love going to museums, listening to music, cooking, and sitting in cafes for prolonged periods of time.
I was born and raised in the lovely state of New Jersey, but grew up in a bilingual and bicultural household because my mother is from Osaka, Japan. Between visiting family annually in Japan to studying abroad for a summer in France, traveling and learning about different cultural perspectives have always been a passion of mine, which is why I initially developed an interest in JASC. Experiencing the 69th Japan-America Student Conference as a delegate last year, the interactions I had with other delegates and the experiences we shared together led me to realize many things about myself and my own cultural identity. JASC was truly “life-changing” for me in every sense of the word. I would love to continue this legacy of “life-changing” experiences for all future delegates, and not only help others grow by sharing my perspectives, but also continue to grow and learn myself, through that of others.
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Ethan Mattos
Email:jasc70.emattos@gmail.com
Hi Everyone! My name is Ethan Mattos and I am a 2017 graduate from Hobart and William Smith Colleges where I studied Public Policy, Sociology, and Women’s Studies. After spending my childhood in Rhode Island, I went to college in upstate New York and moved to Indiana, where I now live and work. Growing up I was involved in the Boy Scouts for 13 years and became an Eagle Scout at 17. I also started sailing 420s at the age of 10 at my local yacht club and was on the sailing team at my high school. During my college career I was the Music Director at WHWS 105.7, our school’s college radio station, where I hosted my own show called “Secret Strawberry”. I am also a brother of the Chi Phi fraternity, being actively involved with planning rush, social events, and helping out with philanthropy. My hobbies include exploring new places, camping, and finding new music to listen to.
The 69th JASC was an incredible and life-changing experience for me. While I entered JASC expecting to be academically enriched, I did not realize how personally fulfilling this conference would become. I gained a lot of knowledge in fields relevant to the Japan-U.S. relationship due to our programming, but what I value most from the 69th JASC is the deep and meaningful friendships I made with both Japanese and American delegates. I ended my JASC 69 experience not only with a new appreciation for Japanese culture and the Japan-U.S. relationship, but also with friendships that I know will last me a lifetime. Serving as Vice Chair on the American side for the 70th JASC, I hope to create a truly unforgettable experience for this year’s delegates, and to help foster meaningful relationships that will last well beyond JASC.
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Jacques Chaumont
Email:jasc70.jchaumont@gmail.com
Hello everyone! My name is Jacques Chaumont and I’m a senior at Williams College, double majoring in Statistics and Japanese. I’m serving as an Executive Committee member on the American side of the 70th Japan America Student Conference and I’m the one who is responsible for getting the IT side of things up and running. Unsurprisingly, my passion for technology has led to the creation of the roundtable: “The Potential of Innovation: Building an Awareness of our Technological Roots,” where I’ll be coordinating with my Japanese EC counterpart, Ayano. In addition to my interests in technology, I actually have a lot of hobbies. Among them are speed-solving Rubik’s cubes, playing the guitar, breakdancing, and photography.
Though I was born and raised in various places on the East Coast, my mother is actually a Japanese immigrant. Having such a background, I grew up with a lot of exposure to Japanese culture. Yet, it wasn’t until I studied abroad two separate times in my college career that I began to better understand of what kinds of productive cultural exchange could happen between American and Japanese people. But even more valuable than my studies abroad was my time participating in the 69th JASC. The engaging discussions, the late-night conversations, and the dozens of lasting friendships formed over those three weeks made for an all-around unforgettable experience. There is really nothing quite like JASC, and because I feel that it is such a special opportunity, I want to help create a comparable experience for next year’s delegates.
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Nicole McNevin
Email:jasc70.nmcnevin@gmail.com
Hello! My name is Nicole McNevin, and I am a recent graduate of Wheaton College in Wheaton, IL, where I majored in Anthropology and minored in Urban Studies. I was born and raised in a small town in Wisconsin, and I now live and work in Louisville, KY. Currently, I am preparing to enter graduate school, where I hope to delve deeper into the mysteries of spirituality and religion. Aside from grad school applications, my free time nowadays is usually consumed by ethnographic inquiry, exercise, and coffee-tasting.
I applied for the 69th JASC as a way to get to Japan – nothing more. But as time went on, I realized that it was turning out to be immensely more meaningful than I could have imagined. Repeatedly throughout JASC, the ingenuity, sincerity, and passion of my fellow delegates touched me, and I grew so much with and through them. I also made professional connections and intellectual discoveries that shaped my academic trajectory, and am looking forward to seeing where they will take me in the future.
As a member of the 2018 Executive Committee, I hope to serve you by contributing to the creation of an inclusive and yet intellectually stimulating environment where your unique strengths and talents can shine. I look forward to meeting you!
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Carolyn Hoover
Email:jasc70.choover@gmail.com
Hello everyone! My name is Carolyn Hoover, and I’m a second year at Duke University where I study Public Policy, Global Health, and Japanese. At Duke, I’m a senator on the student government and a member of the club lacrosse team and Alpha Phi. I grew up in Washington, D.C., so I have been around politics my entire life. From serving as a legislative intern on Capitol Hill to working with the Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs, there is nothing I love more than working to improve my country. As a Japanese-American, I have traveled around the U.S. sharing my family’s story of internment and recently created a documentary about it that was aired at the Smithsonian. Additionally, I’m passionate about cancer research fundraising and recently passed the $350,000 mark. My hobbies include running marathons and doing triathlons — most recently the New York City Triathlon where I was the youngest female to finish and was first in my age group! The 69th JASC was a transformative experience for me and I look forward to creating some more memories with all of you!
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Emika Otsuka
Email:jasc70.eotsuka@gmail.com
Hello everyone! My name is Emika Otsuka, and I am currently a sophomore at Carleton College in Minnesota. Although I haven’t declared my major yet, I will probably double major in Political Science and Sociology. But, the human mind is always changing, so we’ll see how it goes! I was born and raised in Kanagawa-ken, Japan and am now in the U.S for college. At Carleton, I’m mainly involved with SEED, a peer-led professional development program that promotes conversations in communities, and Japanese Circle, a student organization that promotes appreciation of Japanese culture among the Carleton community. I must admit that my experience as a delegate in JASC 69th was eye-opening. Since I’ve spent most of my life in Japan, I assumed that I knew almost everything about Japan and would easily understand how the Japanese delegates thought. However, I soon found that I was wrong. Throughout the discussions with other delegates during programming, I came to know different aspects of Japanese people and culture and my ideas were constantly challenged which made me realize the difficulty and importance of mutual-understanding. The JASC experience made me grow as a person and motivated me to serve as a 70th JASC Executive Committee member. I sincerely hope to make the 70th JASC as inspiring and fulfilling for all delegates as the 69th was for me!
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Kitanna Hiromasa
Email:jasc70.khiromasa@gmail.com
Hi everyone! My name is Kitanna Hiromasa and I’m from the suburbs of Denver, Colorado. I’m a junior at Washington and Lee University, and am currently majoring in Economics as well as East Asian Studies (with a focus in Japanese). I’m the philanthropy chair for my sorority, a member of the Japanese club, and an enthusiastic dancer. I also adore cooking and creative writing!
JASC 69 was an experience that is hard to put into words. It was something that changed my career path and affected me in ways that have still stayed with me. The relationships I made are life-long, and I say that with absolute confidence. I came into JASC 69 thinking I was knowledgeable enough about Japan, but every day I learned something that I didn’t even realize I didn’t know. My fellow delegates taught me about their lives and their cultures. I hope to bring that same sense of community and open-mindedness to JASC 70 as an EC. I hope that our academic as well as cultural programming will hold significance for both Japanese and Americans alike, and will inspire delegates the way I was inspired. I look forward to getting to know you!Back to Top

Christina Zhou
Email:jasc70.czhou@gmail.com
Hi guys! My name is Christina Zhou, and I was born in Phoenix, Arizona, but was raised for most of my life in the suburbs of Los Angeles—Arcadia to be specific. I am a Chinese-American, and have really strong ties to both my Chinese and American roots. I recently graduated from UCLA with a degree in Biology, and was involved in organizations that attempted to bridge disparities in healthcare and science education. Outside of school, I usually spend my time hanging out with friends, dancing, or traveling.
My time within the 69th delegation of JASC surpassed my expectations. I originally came with the intention of simply learning more about healthcare globally, but left enriched with so much more. I try to learn from the people around me, so being surrounded by our driven and intelligent delegation gave me the opportunity to improve and reflect upon myself. I was invigorated by the enthusiasm in our discussions, the genuine interest in diverse cultures, and the wholehearted compassion and care for others displayed by the many delegates. The conversations that we were able to have during JASC were always multi-dimensional and fulfilling, and I’m excited to be able to pass along that experience to the next delegation.
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