JASC 67 Day 13— August 13, 2015 by Johanna Gunawan

After nearly a week in beautiful Shimane, the 67th JASC delegation brought the second
leg of our program to a close with a forum on regional revitalization and following reception.

The day started off as any other at our Sunlake residence: at 6AM; a classical musical track wafted through the hallways and bedrooms as our cue to wake. A light cafeteria breakfast came soon after – and by mid-morning, most of us were fully awake and ready to tackle the day. For a volunteer task force of 14 (One Japanese and one American delegate from each RT group), this morning was spent prepping for a presentation to the residents of Shimane later that afternoon.

Split into three groups, delegates focused on innovating for regional revitalization across three sectors: tourism, industry, and education. I myself was a member of the tourism group, which discussed ways in which to sustainably attract both national and international visitors to the prefecture. After all the meetings, we had a light lunch and (for some, with nervous excitement) headed to the Prefectural Office to share our ideas with Shimane community members and to the rest of the delegation. Several important guests were present, including commentators from well-known businesses in each of the three sectors. Tourism was first, and suggested a linear marketing process for Shimane to follow
(centralize and define a powerful brand image, increase accessibility to the region and its information, and follow up with locally-based resources while keeping a global perspective).

As a digital marketer, I personally wanted to stress the importance of a unified marketing strategy – and expressed this by comparing the differences and issues with Shimane’s Japanese, Korean, and English tourism websites. I’ll be the first to admit that my nerdy obsession with digital marketing made me want to go on and on about this particular fix, but our presentation made sure to equally represent other ideas (such as development of a winter activities program to encourage tourism in more stagnant months).

Industry and Education brought up interesting points that played to Shimane’s strengths
in the medical and IT fields. By expressing and developing the talent and focus of the region, both groups sought to emphasize Shimane as a place for businesses to thrive and for eager students to begin specializing. The Industry group also mentioned the possibility of exporting Shimane products in the developing markets of Southeast Asia, and the Education group thought to utilize the large number of empty dormitories in Shimane to help create or convert new charter and boarding schools in the region. Each group’s presentation was followed by special commentary from Shimane leaders in each respective sector, and question/answer sections also brought out more interesting points from the minds of all the delegates.

After a successful forum and many speeches later, the delegation found itself at the
beautiful English Garden in Matsue, where (thanks to the generosity of Shimane industry leaders and members of the community) delegates, special guests, and host families broke bread together over a beautiful spread of food and drink. Shimane gave two brief performances: one of samurai culture and another by the costumed prefectural mascot, Shimanekko (Shimanekko is a yellow cat, dressed with icons from Shimane’s famous historical Izumo Taisha shrine).

Many photo ops, small plates, and business cards later, the delegation sadly bid good-bye
to our newfound friends, program supporters, and respected community leaders (as tomorrow we were to move to our third location, Kyoto)! The memories of Shimane, however, will forever stay in our hearts. The smiles of our homestay families and the shared countryside experience were an excellent part of our JASC programming, and we gained a perspective many of us would never have seen otherwise. Dan-dan (thank you), Shimane! Until we meet again.

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